Thursday, February 4, 2016

John Seibel, A Native of Bavaria






















According to Sandusky Then and Now, John Seibel was born on February 12, 1820 in Hauenstein, Rhenish, Bavaria, Germany.  In 1851 he married Margaret Bieck. That same year he emigrated to the United States, and settled in Sandusky, Erie County, Ohio. In the 1880 U.S. Census, John Seibel and his wife were residing in Sandusky, Ohio, and he listed his occupation as Grocer. In 1880 the Seibels had a large family of seven children. John Seibel died of blood poisoning on February 4, 1884. He was buried in the St. Mary's Cemetery in Sandusky, Ohio.

Tuesday, February 2, 2016

Catharine Sexton, Wife of Henry Sexton

























According to marriage records at Erie County Probate Court, Catharine Bennett married Henry Sexton on Christmas Day in 1851. Sadly, Mrs. Catharine Sexton died on February 2, 1853, at the age of 28 years and 2 months. This touching inscription is found at the base of Catharine's tombstone at Perkins Cemetery, Erie County, Ohio:

How vain is all beneath the skies
How transient every earthly bliss
How slender all the fondest ties
That bind us to a world like this









Though some of the words have been worn away after all the years of exposure to the elements, a quick Google search helped me track down the inscription, which was found in a book of spiritual songs and poems.

Sunday, January 31, 2016

Daniel T. Larkins, 1838-1905















According to U.S. Census records, Daniel T. Larkins was born in the state of Vermont in 1838. In 1870 Daniel Larkins and his wife Bridget resided in Sandusky, Erie County, Ohio, with their children Mary and James. Mr. Larkins was employed at the spoke factory. Son Daniel P. Larkins was born in 1872.  In the 1880 U.S. Census, the Daniel Larkins family was living on Jefferson Street in Sandusky, and Daniel, the father, was employed as a gas fitter. Both of his parents were listed as natives of Ireland. According to an article from the February 1, 1905 issue of the Sandusky Register, Daniel T. Larkins died at his home at 606 Pearl Street on January 31, 1905, after a lengthy illness. He was 66 years old. Mr. Larkins left behind his wife and one daughter, Mrs. John Powers, and two sons, James Larkins, engineer on the Big Four, and Daniel P. Larkins, a steam fitter. His funeral was held at Holy Angels Church and burial was at the St. Joseph Cemetery in Sandusky, Ohio. I am not positive if this Larkins family is connected with my Larkins line, but both lines were of Irish Catholic descent, and had family members employed in the railroad, and all attended Holy Angels Church. Many, many members of both lines of these Larkins families are buried at St. Joseph Cemetery. 



Saturday, January 30, 2016

Vintage Pictures of Grandpa Steen Parker and His Brothers

Tonight we had a family get-together, and my Aunt Pat on my Mom's side shared some pictures with us, that she allowed me to scan. What fun! Below are some pictures of my maternal grandfather, Steen Leroy Parker. He is just an infant in this one, taken about 1908 at the Bishop studio.






















Grandpa Steen Parker is a toddler in this picture, taken at the Bishop studio about 1910.


















Steen is pictured here with his older brother Glenn Parker, and his younger brother Paul Parker. Baby Janet had not been born yet.






















Thanks so much for sharing these treasures Aunt Pat!!

Wednesday, January 27, 2016

Robert and Mary Ann Cooper, Natives of England













This tombstone honoring the memory of Robert and MaryAnn Carter is located in Block 5 of Sandusky’s Oakland Cemetery. Mrs. Mary Ann Carter died from heart disease in 1879, just a few days after the birth of her youngest child. Robert Carter died from consumption in March of 1889. According to the death record of William Carter, his father Robert had been born in York, England. Mary Ann Carter, whose maiden name was Mary Ann Harrison Spencer had been born in Nottingham, England. A listing in Hellrigle's 1876 Sandusky City Directory listed Robert Carter is residing in Sandusky, Ohio, and his occupation was “plane maker.”  Mr. and Mrs. Robert Carter had six children, including a son William who was a printer for the Sandusky Register. Four of the Carter daughters, Lucy, Frances, Minnie and Amelia (sometimes known as Millie) became school teachers. Another daughter, Emily Carter Siggens, was the mother of Ernie Siggens, who was a football star at Sandusky High School, and went on to serve as Sandusky’s Mayor. 

Sunday, January 24, 2016

Katharina Strohmeier, 1829-1891

































According to her tombstone, Katharina Strohmeier was born in Neulussheim, Germany on September 9, 1829. In 1885, Katharina/Catharine Schmitt married Fred Strohmeier in Erie County, Ohio. On June 1, 1891 Katharina/Catharine Schmitt died at the age of 61.  She was buried in the Schmitt family lot at Sandusky's Oakland Cemetery. A small inscription at the base of the tombstone which honors the memory of Katharina Schmitt Strohmeier indicates that it was created by the Brost brothers.







Thursday, January 21, 2016

William Sherman Taylor, 1864-1930















William Sherman Taylor was born in Perkins Township on June 5, 1864, while the Civil War was still being fought. His parents, Charles W. and Caroline (Wright) Taylor owned a farm in Perkins Township. William's great grandparents, Joseph and Lois Taylor, Sr., were pioneer residents of Erie County, coming west from Connecticut by oxen train in 1815. William's grandfather, Nelson Taylor, served on the first Board of Erie County Commissioners. According to a biographical sketch in A STANDARD HISTORY OF ERIE COUNTY, OHIO, William Sherman Taylor grew up on the old family homestead. He was a farmer and  stock raiser, and he also worked as a dealer in foundry and molding sand. William Sherman Taylor suffered a heart attack as he was driving an automobile on January 21, 1930. Funeral services were held at the Taylor residence, and burial was at Perkins Cemetery. An article about Mr. Taylor's death was featured in the January 22, 1930 issue of the Sandusky Star Journal.